All Walks Beyond the Catwalk -Investing in education. Producing visionaries. Spearheading a paradigm shift in fashion.

All Walks has been lecturing in colleges and universities since September 2010 with amazing results. Students and educators wholeheartedly agree upon the importance of inviting All Walks to help students understand the politics of image. And the lecture rooms are getting bigger and more disciplines are joining.

Each individual student is empowered to feel they can make positive contributions towards the self esteem and body image of their consumer by understanding and honouring diversity in age, size and race…After all most consumers are not catwalk model shaped, nor are they all pale or young! We have also introduced the subject of hype sexualisation to the lectures and expanded it to add male anxiety and body image issues.

Creative exploration of individuality can enhance learning as many tutors have already told us, and we believe it is also a lucrative business proposition to explore the consumer and his or her needs…this is emotionally considerate practice.

Here is a small selection of what students themselves have had to say…

 

COLLEGES AT A GLANCE

Easily the most inspirational presentation I’ve ever sat through. Everything from the exploitation of the model, to the ‘plus size’ and racial diversity issues inspired me further to write what I’ve always wanted to write about and make it clear that diversity is key. Thank you for helping me realise that I’m not the only one who thinks differently. Tem Water – 1st year Writing, Fashion & Culture, Southampton Solent University

This talk spoke to me, it has shown me that the insecurities and uncertainties I feel when looking at magazines are normal, but not acceptable. It’s shown me my responsibility as a maker. It is time to change. Nichole Coxon, Fashion and Apparel Design. University of South Wales

Really good presentation, addressing the main issues in fashion that we subconsciously know but suppress, as it’s the norm. Eye-opening, should be more rolled out across fashion courses. Emily Carter, 3rd year Fashion and Textiles. Colchester School of Art

Brilliant! A real eye opener and so inspirational. ‘All Walks’ is a project that I would love and be proud to be a part of. It feels relevant as we are always a consumer within the industry. It affects us all every day. I really hope that this debate carries on growing. It’s about time that this industry changed. After all, it’s about the clothes, not the model!”Lewis Firth – Level 2 Fashion Design, University of Leeds

Extremely eye-opening, a subject I have felt has needed to be addressed for a long time. Exciting to see a change being made!”Abbie McColl – 2nd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

In design we’re exposed from the start with size 12 block/ mannequins, is this where it starts? Should it be an open choice or built into the curriculum? Also, we’re not taught grading.’ Laura Needle – FDT Womenswear level 3, London College of Fashion

Personally, I hold a strong advocacy for this cause as I’ve been through male anxiety. Fashion needs to open their eyes and I’m glad somebody is fighting the cause. Men need more support. Rhys Evans, 1st year Writing Fashion and Culture, Southampton Solent

“Great presentation. What you have done and how you have changed perceptions and ideology is extremely inspirational. Beautiful work.” Jenny Slater – 3rd Year Fashion Design, Ravensbourne

“I found the presentation inspiring – the most appreciated presentation that has been given to me in my whole time at AUCB.”Rachel Brimacombe – Level 6 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

‘I wanted to leave my course, then guest lecturer Caryn Franklin introduced me to the All Walks project. I saw they work to improve equality and diversity within fashion, which can only have a positive impact on our society. It restored my faith and trust in the fashion industry.’ Declan Higgins Fashion Journalism at London College of Fashion.

“All Walks is important because it is confronting the taboo issues of the fashion world and letting people know that it is ok to be different and not conform. As a black woman entering the fashion world, I care about it greatly. It is an issue I have always been interested in.”Charlotte Stewart , Fashion Journalist – 1st Year at UCA Epsom

‘As a fashion photographer, I would always choose the typical pale, 6ft skinny model. It had never crossed my mind to use anything different. Seeing this made me realise we are not ‘cookie cutter’ people so why should we only represent a tiny percentage?’Anne Marie Michel, age 27, MA fashion and film, London College o Fashion.

‘I will go away from this lecture feeling proud to be different. I feel inspired and it makes me happy to know that something is being done to persuade people it is ok to be who they are’. Stephanie Harrod , age 19, Fashion Marketing, Northumbria.

“All Walks is saying what I want to hear! I think this is what so many people want to hear and we’ve needed something like this organization to come along.” Bryony Grant , Fashion – 3rd Year at Edinburgh

“All Walks is hugely motivational. Clothes are there to be worn and enjoyed by everyone. Everyone is different and that should be celebrated.”Lottie Brooks , Fashion – 3rd Year in Bournemouth

Through my work placements, I’ve felt I’ve lost my environmental and social focus. All Walks has gotten me inspired again. I now feel I can continue with my dream combination…designing AND social responsibility. Johanna Wulff , 3rd Year BA Fashion Studies Bournemouth.

The lecture was a real eye opener. The fashion industry in particular, has to start changing the way it promotes itself. The campaign has inspired me as it shows that some people within the industry are actually doing something. Julia Mcrae age 22. 1st  year  BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I found the lecture very inspiring, the All Walks Beyond the Catwalk campaign is such an amazing idea, something which we definitely need. It was so refreshing to see positive body images that show just how beautiful every shape and size is. It made me think about my own final collection and how I want to create clothes for real sized women and not just follow the trend of the fashion industry and produce a collection to be shown on stick thin models. Amanda Montague age 20. 3rd year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

“This presentation made me feel – inspired, evoked, fantastic, interested, curious, and excited for change… I don’t want to be stuck in the fashion system’s backwardness. Society is changing around us, we must follow!” Imogen Snell  2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

 “Fantastic! Eye-opening, critical and a really fresh breath in the jungle of body image opinions.” Julie Marlen Jurssen Huiruig, MA Fashion Journalism, Central Saint Martins

“Absolutely bloody brilliant. It may sound silly but I genuinely felt emotional after hearing the talk. Even just seeing some of the images in the presentation alone made me feel happier about myself and hopeful for my friends and future daughters or family or whoever else…100 % relevant. Something HAS to drastically change.” Grace Quinn,  2nd Year Fashion Marketing and Branding, Nottingham Trent University

“I’m very supportive of what All Walks Beyond the Catwalk is doing; to shed some light on the elephant in the room is a very brave thing.” Lily Niu, MA Fashion Journalism, Kingston University

“In the industry we work in, I think the debate could not be more relevant in today’s society. I think it’s important to question and argue against the norm in terms of body image.” Harriet Dunn, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“All Walks’ concept of diversity really challenges your thinking and the way you design. It has been a very beneficial experience that has transcended into my work this year for menswear designs taking inspiration from body types in a generation divide and with body altering illnesses such as MS. Ultimately I would desire to create something of comfort and fit.” Andrew McLaren, 3rd Year, Fashion Design, Edinburgh College of Art

“It was fantastic breath of fresh air and what everyone, not only those on a fashion course, needs to hear. I think it is indeed a time of change. Designers hold a lot of power (even if they don’t realise it) and can change things.” Susanna Wen, 1st Year Fashion Design, Kingston University

“Most inspirational lecture I have ever had. I myself am a size twelve, and it’s amazing to know that industry professionals whose insight is as respected as Caryn’s are working towards a change. Women should be able to consume media, which doesn’t make them what to change. Fashion should give women confidence and not insecurities.” Rebecca Catlow,  2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“Universities should include as module-Not Optional—it’s that important.” Emma Louise Pauline Mitchell, Year 1: Fashion Knitwear, Winchester School of Art

“All Walks’ presentation was very informative towards a direction of passion within us all. This presentation ignited a flame I’d really like to look into.” Nicola Lord, 3rd Year Fashion Design, Winchester School of Art

“I am going to take this lecture on board and contemplate designing for different ages and sizes…I never really thought about these issues in depth, I always knew they were there, but followed the ‘normal’ way of designing on a skinny template. I will now explore different size models/shapes and try to open my eyes in the future.” Nicola James, 2nd Year Fashion, Plymouth College of Art

“I feel more confident in being able to voice my opinion…I am looking forward to witnessing and aiding the change in the future.” Gina Solanki, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“This debate is relevant to every single individual. As a parent I am aware of the impact that the industry and media will have, if not already have, on my five year old daughter. Knowledge is empowering. Thank you.” Sophie Marlborough-Fletcher, Fashion (top-up), Plymouth College of Art

“Love the refreshing and realness of this talk! Thank god for having someone real talking to us rather then telling us what’s “cool.” Lucie Halley, 3rd Year Fashion, Kingston University

“This presentation has opened my eyes and I will no keep and will now keep an open mind when starting out in the industry.” Sinead Gibbons,2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“I feel like Caryn has put into work my thoughts and feelings about the absurdity of body image today, which I was unable to express in a coherent way. It was truly inspiring and shamefully obvious; it’s almost embarrassing to have been sucked into this world of warped body image.” Charlotte Bourgaize, 2nd Year BA Fashion, Kingston University

I found this presentation truly influential—mentioning issues close to my heart. It really drives debate as well as a passion to consider a design/collection speaking greater than clothes/image through fashion–HAVE GREATER DEPTH. Is that not what a designer should do?.. I do (want to) …Fashion has marked many movements in history…It’s time to make a statement which everyone can relate to.” Natalie Stephenson, 3rd Year Fashion Design, Winchester School of Art

“About time! Having grown up through the 80s & 90s, when the more athletic shapes of the supermodels were held up as the ideal. And when the ‘waif’ look hit in the mid 90s, I remember such an uproar. Now, the same look is considered normal. I would love to use size 12 models in a mainstream catwalk show and feel inspired to do so, and find larger models—why not?!” Abi McBride, 2nd Year Fashion, Plymouth College of Art

“This presentation was long overdue! We are controlled in all aspects of our lives-fashion is meant to be a form of escapism but even there we are limited by narrow-minded ideals.” Rachel Lynch-Foundation Art and Design, South Essex College.

“This campaign is a brilliant idea! People (especially young teenagers) need to be made aware of how unnatural the images they are seeing really are. Something needs to change!” Katie Parmenter-1st Year, Fashion Design, Liverpool John Moores University.

“It is incredible to see Caryn and All Walks taking the shocking facts and stats and being proactive, raising awareness and proving that every body is beautiful!” Laura Rietdyk-Johnson-1st Year, Fashion Brand Management, University of Central Lancashire.

 

Academic year impact feedback 2013/2014

 

Liverpool John Moores University

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% say YES.

I particularly like how you aim to build self-esteem as I think it is something that stops people achieving their full potential, through constant self-doubt. Allysia Lawrence, Level 4 Fashion Design.

I found the presentation very interesting and relatable as I had previously spent a lot of time on my foundation course on a self-directed project ‘what is beauty,’ where I looked at the idea of ‘is there a definition of perfection’. I totally agree with the negativity towards the provocative fashion imagery, as I found it quite disturbing. If it’s a ‘fashion’ based shoot surely it should be about making the model look the best they can in the clothes they are in i.e. angles, lighting – and not nudity. Georgina Dunn, 1st year Fashion

I think All Walks/ Diversity Now is a great concept with views and opinions that should be more thought about by the majority of consumers. As somebody who has struggled with self-esteem due to feeling too large (although I was a UK 8/10) because of models, and the prejudice about having tattoos and piercings and eccentricities, I feel that is it a very important subject matter. Roxie Mealy, Level 4 Fashion Communication.

It’s made me realise how crazy our society is within the media. I think it’s just as important to stop glorifying objectification as it is to show diversity. And being diverse without showing redheads and freckles is wrong. You can use more diversity, it is needed. Helen Davies, 1st year Graphic Design.

What I have seen in the adverts is controversial but controversy gets people talking. It’s less about promoting certain fashion pieces and more about getting people talking about the brand and thus more promotion. Sam Nelson, Level 4 Fashion Communication.

Sexist and disturbing. Unfortunately we are living in a society where men should be strong and allowed to do whatever they want, and women should be submissive. The most crucial thing for us as humans is to educate our children, as we should show them diversity. Amdersom Rael dos Santos, 1st year Spatial Design

Inspiring, oddly obvious, and still not mainstream. Very well said, thank you. Camilla de Saint Sauveur, Graphic Design and Illustration.

This presentation gave me an understanding of how people see and expect models to look like. I also agree that fashion needs to introduce a wider variety of diversity when it comes to modeling e.g. skin tone, weight and age. Caryn also explains there are different kinds of beauty, not just being skinny. Agreed. Christopher Barnes, 1st Year Graphic Design and Illustration.

I found the presentation very interesting and Caryn delivered it in an attention holding way. I did agree with the word healthy being mentioned more, but I do understand that it is difficult to portray through imagery and can be quite controversial to discuss what ‘healthy’ is. I also liked the point of not branding thin as wrong, as a body type, because it is something I have been criticised on – being naturally thin. Shannon Tran, Level 4 Fashion Communication.

I found the presentation truly inspirational and I feel that Caryn has given me the confidence to use a range of models in my work. Emma Conway, 1st year Fashion Design.

Very interesting, I’ve never looked at adverts and actually thought about what is happening in them. However, I will from now on. It’s obvious that people are so used to it, nobody thinks to complain. Georgia Spence, 1st year Graphic Design and Illustration

Great ideas. I wonder if some of the specific ‘shock tactics’ featured (eg. American Apparel) have been used to gain publicity and attention. With their choice of advertising, promo has been gained as we are all talking about these specific campaigns. Sophie Corkhill, 1st year Fashion Communication.

I feel that diversity is positive and more designers should use a range of models, and no airbrushing, as they are creating an unrealistic image that you feel you need to look like. Jennifer Bray, 1st year Fashion Design.

Criticisms Too centered on the high end of fashion. Too much on skintone, look at street-ware industry and American Apparel. Saying our generation is this and that when it is not, not contained within the mainstream and the primary examples of mainstream culture. Connor Spink, Year 1 Graphic Design and Illustration.

Diversity can be extremely beneficial to more rural communities. I am from Cornwall and despite being part of the UK, it is a very racist part of the country even though is it slowly becoming more multi-cultural. The majority of the population in Cornwall are white-Caucasian, and with the jokes and slander against ethnic minorities and people from other religious communities, it can become a dangerous place for individuals from this background. So diversity really needs to be explored and portrayed in the media country-wide. Thomas Hawkins, 1st year Graphic Design and Illustration.

Ravensbourne

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% YES

I love the All Walks campaign. This has been our second lecture on the campaign and both have been inspiring. The last even led me to focus an entire written piece on the subject of the diversity system within fashion. To me, the idea of change and encouraging a new way of thinking is exciting and I would like it to come through in my own work. I believe that fashion is about being inspirational and you don’t have to create that dream with only one aesthetic. In such modern times, everyone needs to be more open minded and willing to step away from the old formulated system. Thank you. Lillie Cooper, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

I absolutely loved the presentation, I felt it was highly engaging and conceptual, and refreshing to be in a lecture that was challenging convention and not teaching us how to conform to industry practice. It was thought provoking arresting to have a connection with a societal topic that is realistic. I think it is sometimes very overwhelming to work and study in an industry that I often feel is going against my morals and beliefs. Natalie Catherine Bell, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

I always find lectures like this extremely intriguing and beneficial. Deconstructing imagery is vital, but its something not everyone can do in the way we saw today. Within this lecture alone, I have understood another way in thinking, both in imagery, and how we, the consumers, look for what inspires us. Victoria Simpson, 2nd year Fashion promotion.

I feel that the presentation has been very insightful and had reiterated my thoughts on the fashion industry. It makes me want to continue to challenge the ideal beauty as I have already done so since our last talk with All Walks. I am also inspired to be more confident in my own appearance. I think it’s blindly obvious that the industry is very influential on people’s minds and ideas of beauty – people have unrealistic expectations of their own bodies, to not age etc. Rebecca Lightbody, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

I think that this presentation is fundamental to young creative like me as it covers a lot of issues that get ignored and pushed under the rug when they should be questioned and tackled. It opened my eyes to things that I often think and worry about. It is vital to educate these issues to the future of the industry. Elizabeth Fowle, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

I love the idea of All Walks and especially with regards to men and how this idea of men’s diversity is changing. Love how relevant points have been made i.e Miley Cyrus and Lily Allen racism debate. Brilliant to see people who want change. Nathan Henry, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

It’s vital to explore every area of the industry when working in promotion. Promotion is about audience and we are the audience. Reaching out to an audience means understanding and having an opinion. The presentation boldens the current status of what’s going on in the world. Especially the empowerment of women. Jasmine MacPhee, Level 2 Fashion Promotion.

All Walks pointed out that young women/girls look at fashion industry as inspirational, but when is full of abuse and pornography, I think it is very urgent to act. Sara Babikz, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

A truly inspirational talk. I normally feel that I don’t have a voice within fashion but after this talk it has now made me feel that I can help change and motivate this new age of fashion. Shawn Wilkinson-Clarke, 2nd year Fashion Promotion.

University of South Wales

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% say yes.

I’ve followed All Walks for a few years and totally and wholeheartedly support its views. I also think its important to mention that this presentation, although also subconsciously making the viewer think, is not forceful, which is empowering in itself. I’ve already thought about the type of model I want to show my clothes in, and because of organisations like All Walks, I have thought more about it earlier on, than I probably would have. But I am honestly unsure as to whether huge fashion conglomerates will ever change though. Too far gone, too much influence and too much money is already being made. Ben Thomas, 3rd year Fashion Design.

Makes me question how I can do more within my practice to challenge preconceptions that have been forced upon us through capitalism. I hope that diversity with fashion advertising does not become another money making scheme. Fatima Ahmed, 3rd year Fashion Design.

Really encouraging and enlightening presentation, looking at advertisements that I have seen many times before but made me question and think about them differently. However, as students soon to graduate, it is our portfolios that are going to get us jobs. Our tutors encourage us to design and illustrate on a long-legged, skinny silhouette. I think this should be touched on more about us being encouraged to design like this, and sending us off into the industry with why we need these illustrations and customer ideals in our portfolios. Really encouraging as Caryn said; “go with your gut and don’t be afraid to challenge.” Sarah Dimery, 3rd year Fashion Design

I wanted to create a diverse brand but I began to feel pressured into small sizes but this reaffirmed my desire. I now feel I have the confidence to do it and I feel it can be successful rather than just a novelty. (I am recovering from 10 years of anorexia fueled by fashion) Chyronne Le Monnuer, 2nd year Fashion Design.

I found the presentation inspiring, and an eye opener. As I’m studying photography for fashion and advertising, I was appalled at the degrading and objectifying images. The Sisley editorials in particular. I liked how successful the images of the variety of shapes and sizes were with the consumers. Amelia Gale-Masleham, 2nd year Photography for Fashion and Advertising.

It was so nice to see that someone so high up in the fashion industry feel that a diverse range of models should be used. I feel that the ‘size zero’ world we live in is unhealthy, not only for the models, but for the young girls who aspire to be them. Alice Morse, Photography for Fashion and Advertising.

Gave me a real insight into the fashion industry and how us as creators don’t think about realistic individuals. The presentation has really inspired me to think more in detail about my final collection. Jasmine Bautell, 3rd year Fashion Design.

I feel it is a subject and a point that needs to come out to as many in the industry as possible. It’s very important to address these things, and I would love it if the fashion ideal would become more diverse while I’m in it. Helga Gydesen, 3rd year Fashion Design.

Really motivational. I completely agree with everything All Walks says. Ruby Lessels, 3rd year Fashion Design.

I’ve always felt like I had to design in a certain way in order for it to be considered appropriate. This presentation has made me realise that I can have my own voice and move outside of the box when designing. A size 6 myself, I can relate to smaller models so I can understand completely that there needs to be a diverse range of models in order for women to be able to relate to fashion. As a designer, I will now consider a range of sizes so as to target a wider range of women! Amber Littlewood, 2nd year, Fashion Design.

It was very reassuring hearing that someone who has worked in the fashion industry for so long wants to see change. Holly Sparks, 2nd year Photography for Fashion and Advertising.

Truly inspirational. The All Walks talk really opened my eyes and my inner voice. There needs to be a dramatic challenge in the way models are cast, and more diversity as everyone is different, from different walks of life. Aaron Tiley, 1st year Fashion Design.

Was such an inspirational talk. Completely agree with what was discussed and promoted. Larger amount of programs such as ‘Fabulous Fashionistas’ need to be made and promoted to all audiences. We need to create a new ‘norm’. Brands and magazines have to move away from the stereotypical vision that has been implied so they influence the future fashion designers and promoters. Bryany Marsden, 2nd year Fashion Design.

I thought the presentation was very eye-opening. Some of the image shown really shocked me. I don’t find those images fashionable at all, and it’s quite difficult to see how other people could see that they look good. Emma Davies, 1st year Fashion.

After this presentation, I feel more aware of the objectification of models and the growing need for ordinary models. I feel more confident in my goals of producing a high-end label for the modern everyday woman. Katie Downey, 1st year Fashion Design.

I often feel stuck within fashion boundaries and unable to do as I feel will benefit myself, the industry, environment and customers. The presentation has made me realise that there are many things I can do to change this and has reassured that what I feel is right. Nia Richards, 3rd year Fashion Design.

Excellent presentation! Felt almost empowering to be yourself and strive to allow others to be themselves in future commercial photography. Suzi Bord, year 2 Fashion.

Central Saint Martins

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% say YES

I thoroughly enjoyed the presentation! For sometime now I’ve thought that the vacant, skinny, emotionless model that is so often presented and thought of as ‘the’ thing is so overrated. I find it much more interesting when designers use older models with ‘obvious’ character. However, I also feel that I may be drawn to use older models partly due to the fact that they are essentially a rarity in fashion industry and we are after all always drawn to what’s different, far away and rare. Rose Caralier-Smith, 1st year Fashion Communications and Promotion.

Being a Chinese student at CSM; I chose to come to the centre of radical fashion to fully utilise my ethnicity because I believe that people of my race, and size specifically, are not widely represented. Prior to the talk I had no knowledge of the initiative, but after listening to All Walks articulate and informed take on individuality, I believe that I do not stand alone in my voice/beliefs. Adrier Chiun, 1st year Fashion Journalism.

Diversity definitely needs to be addressed. Even from the time we were young girls we were playing with Barbie dolls who were impossibly thin. Had I not been influenced by that kind of toy and exposed to more campaigns like the ones Dove are doing now, my ideas of fashion would be very different. Being in a fashion course I do feel pressured to look a certain way, even though I know it is not necessary. Ines Amerelli, 1st year Fashion Journalism.

It’s amazing to see preconceived ideas that are forced upon people through the media being challenged. I’ve never understood why completely natural bodies are considered to be dirty, ugly and simply wrong. It’s sad to see people do the things they do, wear the things they wear, and live the way they live, without considering ‘why, ’which is exactly why All Walks is so relevant. Julia van Ijka, 1st year Fashoin Communication and Promotion.

The All Walks lecture is great! I feel like fashion photography and imagery have become so banal – this could give rise to both a new wave of tolerance and creativity. I think all established ‘fashion creatives’ should be challenged to produce something using non-conventional subjects. Karl Lagerfeld is no legendary designer if he can only design to one body shape! William Scarborough, 1st year Fashion Communication and Promotion.

The presentation was inspiring and realistic. The concept strong and brave . Incorporating diversity into fashion will broaden the field and will boost the consumer’s self-esteem. Fashion is a role model to many people and I believe fashion should be as fair as it can be. From my perspective, I think many high-brand designers are cautious of applying diverse models and are swimming in circles to be safe by being as commercial as possible. Caroline Seong, 1st year Fashion Communication and Fashion Journalism.

It allowed me to consider the implications of fashion imagery whereby I might have previously overlooked its significance and impact. Lilly Roberts, 1st year Fashion History and Theory.

Makes me really think about how much advertisements influence the way you see things – being so engrossed in advertisement of the ‘ideal’ body you forget the influence of it. Love the idea of seeing people as individuals rather than a collective of the same thing. Sam Khoury, 1sy year Fashion Communication and Promotion.

The presentation explored all forms of diversity and made me question elements of beauty and the portrayal of fashion in the 21st century. Imagery that we have become unaffected by and consider normal now appear so different to what I would have seen before. I feel I can look at fashion imagery with a much more open mind. Max Tuson, 1st year Fashion Journalism.

The presentation was very informative and interesting in the approach of widening fashion messaging. I feel very supportive of the concepts being explored and am excited by the examples shown in starting this exploration. It’s interesting that we are now questioning our perceptions of ideal beauty and creativity and hopefully diversity will follow with education. Kirsty Waters, 1st year Fashion History and Theory.

Eye opening presentation. Can hypersexualisation, when put in the right hands, become part of feminism? How can we work with big groups to help them promote in a more ethical way? Pierre Alexadnro M’Pele’, 1st Year Fashion Journalism.

London College of Fashion

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% Say yes.

The presentation was extremely inspirational I think its great that new concepts and ideas related to identity are being explored. I do believe, very strongly, that ‘fashion has the power to change anything’. If young and creative minds that are the future of fashion, are given a chance like this to push boundaries and reveal parts of society that are unknown to the common man, then fashion can  achieve extraordinary heights.  Ayesha Kalyaniwalla, 2nd year, designer pattern cutter.

Very inspiring talk. Really interesting about how we switch off natural feelings of discomfort towards things and normalise them. How different would we be if we didn’t have this function; would we be better/worse off? Rosemary Lambert, 3rd year Womenswear.

The presentation was an inspiration. Although the speaker said there are only 2 genders, there are 3, there are also gender queer people, I am gender queer. Luke Craggs, 3rd year Creative Direction for Fashion.

In design, we’re exposed from the start with a size 12 block mannequin, is this where it starts? We’re not taught grading to use/change a size 12. On the other hand, is it too late and do contributing designers honestly believe it needs to change or do they use it as publicity? Laura Needle, 3rd year Womenswear.

It made me reconsider how I would shoot my lookbook. I may consider doing it around the theme of community. J.Tremaine, 3rd year Menswear.

Absolutely inspiring. I think the idea of showing larger/darker models is a brilliant way to ease the fashion industry into showing more diversity. I think its especially important to inform the public of the link between body and power. Lauren Pilgreen, 3rd year Womenswear design.

I think representing diversity, individuality and identity is crucial in today’s time, and it’s phenomenal that you are taking this a step further by involving future innovators. Vir Shele, 3rd year, womenswear.

Really strong points which made me question and explore my role as a creative and the impact we can have. It has definitely made me think about my own work, even though I have always been inspired by older women. Helen Marie Peet, 3rd year Creative Direction for Fashion.

Very helpful and inspirational talk, it is not often that diversity is explored so passionately within fashion and to have this at education level may produce a new generation and really make a difference. Beth Smith, 2nd year Sportswear.

Very inspiring presentation. It changed my vision of myself. Before I thought I was overweight, and it didn’t seem acceptable for me. But after Caryn’s speech, my opinion has changed, thank you! Renata Luti, 1st year Fashion Contour Studemt.

It saddens me that in 2013 we are having to be taught as an industry to represent our customer base, when we should be doing that already – making clothes for real people, showing the clothes on real people. The slides of ads were shocking and the ‘rape’ insinuating ones made me feel uncomfortable as a woman. Fantastic presentation. Carey Armstrong, 1st year FDA Designer Patter Cutter.

I think it’s extremely crucial that we train the future processionals to open their eyes and raise above the blinded consumer – in order to help the consumer and the society as a whole to engage in the solution for the issue of falsified body image. Lotta Kortekallio, MA Media Practice and Criticsim.

I think it’s interesting to wonder which designers are using this diversity platform for self-promotion rather than properly being on board with true diversity in fashion. Rebecca Hollis, 3rd year Womenswear.

The talk is great, all of it! I think its good to break to mould of ideals of what we work with and it should be diverse because that is the world we live in. I think your presentation and understanding concepts explored is the step towards massive change. Change needed in fashion, and everyday life. Lucia Kelly, 3rd year Womenswear.

Colchester School of Art

Would you prefer to be part of an industry that behaves in an emotionally considerable way to promote positive self-esteem? 100% say yes.

Incredibly inspiring talk, as the mother of a 10 year old girl, I am worried about how these issues will affect her. I have requested the lecturer on my course to invest in at least one ‘plus size’ mannequin to use at the college, but have been told they are too expensive. But they did say I could pad a size 10 to a plus size proportions. Jessica Meadow, 2nd year BA Fashion and Textiles

I found this presentation really inspiring and it touched on a lot of concepts and ideas. However, I would be interested to see more focus on the impact of these fashion campaigns on the ideals of what women should look like in the eyes of men. Are young primary school boys being taught the same about fashion and the media? Also the role of pornography in fashion. Laura Douglas, 3rd year BA Fashion and Textiles.

I found the presentation interesting, and it made me aware of how the media can alter your opinion of yourself, by wanting you to feel your best when young and thin. I also thought that the usual models made me look at their garments mostly, but with the images of the average size model, it made me look at them instead, because it is something different. Faye O’Brien, 2nd year Fashion and Textiles.

I think it was really interesting, I agree that if women see other women like themselves modelling clothes they may feel more confident in wearing them and they may appeal to them more. I can relate to this myself and with friends and family. Hayley Bennett, 2nd year BA Fashion and Textiles.

I agree with the presentation in the sense that everyone is different, everyone has their own personalities, styles, and are unique. You can’t single people out or throw them aside just because of their gender, age, size, skin or disability. Everyone should be treated as equals. Equally special and important. Lauren Morris, 2nd year Fashion and Textiles.

 

Southampton Solent University

I love the work you are doing. I am an exchange student from Finland. I almost quit university prior to coming here because I don’t feel comfortable working in the fashion industry the way it is now (lacking diversity and post-production). But knowing about your work inspired me keep on going so thank you! Asta Rukonen, 2nd year Fashion Make-up and Hair.

The presentation was interesting and thought provoking, especially being a part of a racial minority. It was interesting to see someone else’s opinion on what I’ve thought was a problem. As the next generation of young fashion professionals, I think it is important to shape or challenge our own views now. Roshan Senthi, 1st year Fashion Promotion.

I agree. I have thought about the problematic industry for a while and worried that I was doing the wrong course because I didn’t want to be part of the industry that warped body image. But I feel better knowing that there is an organistion like this one. I would like to change the catwalk for younger generations.” Megan Williamson, 2nd year Makeup and Hair

In an industry that is constantly disempowering women, putting huge pressure on men to behave a set way, and disregarding people because of their race, age and ability, it is so important to make a conscious effort to change the way we think about the way fashion is presented. Regardless of whether diversity has business currency, diversity is essential in healing the wound that formulaic representations have left in our society. Rebecca Bardwell, 2nd year Makeup and Hair Design.

The world is so diverse and we are not recognising this through fashion. We have been conditioned to think a certain way but actually what is beautiful? Normal people are beautiful. Hannah de Mowbray, 3rd year Makeup and Hair Design.

I am over 50 years old and I really enjoyed the lecture. I am setting up as a sole trader to design for fuller and mature figure special occasion wear, that is ethically and environmentally sound. I believe that the concepts could be broadened to engage suppliers to the fashion industry. Sue Carley, 3rd year BA Fashion Design.
This presentation clearly demonstrates how we can push aside stereotypes of fashion models and include people that break the mould. A fresh take on not being narrow minded within this industry, as young boys and girls will see these campaigns and won’t change themselves; they’re beautiful. Alyse Attan, BA Makeup and Hair Design.

The presentation has helped me broaden my thoughts on the industry. From now on I will become more thoughtful when styling shoots and will now become more diverse. James Chandler, 1st Year Fashion Styling

I really loved the presentation, very visually shocking and it really raised crucial questions that the fashion world should be exploring more often. Hannah Luque Rhodes, 2nd year Writing Fashion and Culture.

I think this presentation was an eye opener! It has made me realise that it is down to us as a society to change the way body image is perceived. Power to the people! Charlotte Macdonald, 3rd year Fashion Styling and Makeup

It’s good to see people in the industry are thinking about real people and respect for models as a person not a blank canvas for clothes. Louise Bell, 1st year Fashion Styling

It’s heartening to know that the All Walks campaigns are having such a positive effect on at least some areas of the fashion industry including advertisements. The presentation also brought to my attention the use of men in fashion (how they are portrayed on the catwalk) and it is an area that needs to be addressed more. Beth Grant, 2nd year Writing Fashion and Culture.

I think it’s fabulous that people are being encouraged to shine and be exactly who they are and to be proud of it. Confidence makes you beautiful whether you’re a different shape, size, or culture. Jennifer Higson, 2nd year Makeup and Hair Design.

I love the idea of the campaign but feel there is still a long way to go. All models used were still “beautiful” so I think more should be done to challenge this? Also I feel gender wasn’t touched upon enough. Adam Swain, 2nd year Makeup and Hair Design.

 

Leeds College of Art

An incredibly important issue that has to be addressed if we as fashion communicators intend to promote a healthy, realistic ideal. For future generations it is the idea of re-establishing our self-esteem. Emma Cook, 3rd year Fashion Concepts and Communication.

It has actually made me think of how the fashion industry is no different to porn. We have this unachievable image thrown at us that we think is ‘normal’. It is actually sad and scary; we all desire to be robots! If there were change we would feel power and confidence, rather than the corporations. Larissa Drozd, 3rd year Fashion Concepts and Communication.

As a design student we are under a huge amount of pressure to conform to the industries expectation of ‘what sells.’ We ‘have’ to over-sexualise our designs; we ‘have’ to design in smaller sizes. The pressure is if we don’t conform we won’t succeed and get jobs. Creative leaders need to do more; they have so much power yet perpetuate the same ideas season-after-season. Lewis Fimm, 4th year Fashion Design

It’s terrifying, when did the boundaries between fashion photography and porn collapse? Ann Barber, 2nd year Fashion Design.

I found the ideas and concepts explored in the presentation extremely interesting and inspiring. The discussion of fashion imagery in the media particularly interested me as it really opened my eyes to the idea that, we, as consumers of imagery in the fashion industry, have our ‘volume’ turned down. It made me realise just how much information we are ‘fed’ and accept it without questioning it, particularly with body size/images considered as ‘normal’. Charlotte Jackson, 2nd year Fashion Design

I really enjoyed how the presentation focused on the issues surrounding men in fashion and the media. I feel that the voice of the male model is not communicated effectively and requires a lot more exploration and discussion. Also how men are represented as symbols of authority and physical power over women. Dan Jones, 3rd year Fashion Design and Realisation

I feel it is necessary to point out how much impact the fashion industry really has. I feel that fashion should take responsibility to all walks of life to respect and love everyone no matter how old and how they look. I feel a lot more strongly about how the over-sexualisation effects women of a young age and influences your morality. Gabrielle Little, 3rd year Fashion Concepts and Communication.

It is a good idea to involve young creatives as they are the next generation of fashion designers. There is a strong representation of feminism and how it is portrayed in the media and advertising. Charlotte Lunt, 3rd year Fashion Design and Realisation.

I really enjoyed the presentation – it is important for fashion to be diverse in order for it evolve. Nataffsca Leu, 3rd year Fashion Communication

A very inspiring talk that lead me to consider issues of diversity in fashion that I hadn’t considered before. Really pleased that you discussed issues of the body in men’s fashion. It seems a lot of people only want to talk about body image issues in women’s fashion. Emma Hooper, Level 4 Fashion Design.

I was particularly interested in the thoughts of women in the media and how they are sexualised in order to sell products. The idea of shaking the confidence of the women in order for the advertiser to create a market out of consumers that weren’t there before. Ellen Haneer. 3rd year Fashion Design and Realisation.

Extremely inspired by the concepts explored. I feel we are massively diverse and multicultural country. However, as creatives we seem to take what we see from race, ethnicity, culture, and subcultures, and repeat to stick it on a thin white wall again and again. Rosie Edmonds. 3rd year Fashion Design and Realisation.

I found the presentation very interesting. Sometimes you forget or don’t consider the overwhelming role of the media and advertising on body image and self esteem. I felt this presentation addressed these issues and reminded me that everybody is beautiful! Elizabeth Knight. 3rd year Fashion Design and Realisation.

 ‘ I think representing diversity, individuality and identity is crucial in today’s time and its phenomenal that you are taking this a step further by involving future innovations.’Vir Shete – BA Womenswear level 3, London College of Fashion
‘ The presentation was very insightful! It was great to hear Caryn’s opinions on diversity and she made a lot of points that have enlightened me.’
Ebele Ojechi – BA womenswear sportswear level 2, London College of Fashion

‘Supermodel is just a job. We should not forget that we are not blaming they are young, thin, tall. We are just raising attention of diversity. But also, we should not forget that people who always talk about the difference among human beings are usually the ones who are being racist. The point is we need to remind people nowadays that there are a ‘good range’ of people who can also get involved in ‘fashion.’ We are not supposed to get used to only young, thin models to present both high street and luxury fashion brands. It’s all about classification and self-esteem in the fashion industry. I mean the higher self – esteem the higher level in the classification.’
Kate Cheung wing Ki – BA Fashion textiles level 2, London College of Fashion

‘ ABSOLUTELY INSPIRING. I think this idea of showing larger, darker models is a brilliant way to ease the fashion industry into showing more diversity. I think its especially important to inform the public of the link between body hair and power.’
Lauren Pilgreen – BA Womenswear level 3, London College of Fashion

‘It made me reconsider how I would shoot my look book – I may consider doing it around the theme community.’
J. Tremaine – BA Menswear level 3, London College of Fashion

‘ I think it’s great that new concepts and ideas related to identity are being explored. I do believe, very strongly, that ‘Fashion has the power to change anything.’ If young and creative minds (who are the future of fashion) are given a chance like this to push boundaries and reveal parts of society that are unknown to the common man, then fashion can achieve extraordinary heights. The presentation by Caryn was extremely inspirational. Thank You.’
Ayesha Kalyaniwalla – Designer Pattern Cutter, London College of Fashion
‘ Anything that promotes diversity in any area especially within fashion is only a good thing.’
William Larkin – FDA Pattern Cutter level 1, London College of Fashion

‘It saddens me that in 2013 we are having to be taught as an industry to represent our customer base, when we should be doing that already. Making clothes for real people, showing the clothes on real people.’
Carey Armstrong – FDA Patten Cutter level 1, London College of Fashion

‘ Very helpful and inspirational, it is not often that diversity is explored so passionately within fashion and to have this at education level may produce new generation and really make a difference.’
Beth Smith – BA Fashion Sportswear level 2, London College of Fashion

 

Ravensbourne

‘ Very interesting and engaging talk. As I am working to start my own magazine, it made me think about making the editorials speak about the individual they are portraying and their personalities and achievements rather than simply a well – presented narrative.’
Alisa Milchevskaya – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne University

‘I love the idea of ‘All Walks’ and points made especially with regards to me and how this idea of mens diversity is changing. Love how relevant points have been made for example, Miley Cyrus and Lily Allen racism debate. With the men and body issues it might be useful to have mentioned some shows of models that really are too thin? Saint Laurent being one that I know of. I love and really appreciate the fact you answered questions too and also tweet I have sent you with regards to model diversity. As a student connecting to professionals is hard and you proves it is at ease but also how fashion can send positive messages. Brilliant to see people who want a change.’Nathan Henry – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne University

‘I think that this presentation is fundamental to young creative’s like me as it covers a lot of issues that get ignored and pushed under the rug when they should be questioned and tackled. It opened my eyes to things that I often think and worry about. It is vital to educate these issues to the future of the industry.’
Elizabeth Taylor – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne University

‘I absolutely loved the presentation; I felt it was highly engaging and conceptual and refreshing to be in a lecture that was challenging convention and not teaching us how to conform to industry practise. It was thought provoking to have the connection with a societal topic that is realistic. I think sometimes it can be very overwhelming to work and study in an industry that I often feel is going against my morals and beliefs. I find myself questioning whether this really is an industry I want to go into. However, Caryn evoked a thought process within me, that has been encouraging as it’s comforting to see that there are industry professionals that feel the same and are motioning a change.’
Natalie Catherine Bell – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne University

‘ I love the ‘All Walks’ campaign. This has been our second lecture on the campaign and both have been very inspiring – the last even led me to focus an entire written piece on the subject of diversity and the system within fashion. To me the idea of change and encouraging a new way of thinking is exciting and would like it to come through in my own work. I believe that fashion is about being inspirational and you don’t have to create that dream with only one aesthetic in such ‘modern’ times everyone needs to be more open minded and willing to step away from the old formulated system. Thank you Caryn – another eye opening presentation and something to think about and act on.’
Lillie Cooper – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne

‘ I’d love to see more people and mainly industry people thinking in this way. As a student I see how many people around me see fashion in a very wrong way – they are angry about it (because of what type and race models are advertising and making them think of how they are suppose to look) and strangely how uncomfortable they get after seeing adverts like Debenhams. I wish to see more people not from the fashion industry realising that the way they look, the style they like, the places they go is absolutely great. They don’t have to live that ‘ fashion dream’ that industry are selling to them.’
Paula Prakapaite – Fashion Promotion level 2, Ravensbourne

 

The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“All Walks is important because a further exposure of non-stereotypical is great for displaying a more universal standard of beauty.” Becky Cotterell , Fashion – 3rd Year in Bournemouth

All Walks is setting a benchmark for us as young designers to consider models of all ages and shapes in our work, as well as to consider the impact which our work may have on the consumer.” Claire Hadley , Fashion – 3rd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is a breath of fresh air and just what the fashion industry needs at this time, too much pressure is being put on females, particularly young girls – and All Walks shows these women a more realistic and (I believe) a more beautiful side to fashion.” Talia Rose Sayer , Fashion – 1st Year in Bournemouth

“What I really love about the All Walks Beyond the Catwalk is that it is showing that fashion can be for anyone. I have noticed how difficult it is to steer away from the typical model look, they are always young, tall and thin. Unfortunately many women aspire to be these women and if they don’t fit within the criteria they are considered to be unfashionable. It is this that I think really needs to be addressed and All Walks is doing that.” Victoria Smith , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

 

Academic impact feedback from 2010-2012

Southampton Solent University

“Absolutely ecstatic about this presentation!  I am actually a model (commercial).  I’ve spent 10 years being told “great face too big”…”great face too small”.  It embodies everyone and doesn’t single out anyone!” Anna Louise Dockeray- 2nd year Fashion Styling, Southampton Solent University

“I found it really inspirational – I love the thought of diversity!” Caroline Jeffery – 2nd Year Fashion Promotion, Southampton Solent University

“Hugely empowering and exciting.” Heather Williams- Fashion Management with Marketing, Southampton Solent University

“An essential part of the industry which has been overlooked for so long has been brought to the forefront.” Katie Dunbar – 1st year Fashion Management & Marketing, Southampton Solent University

“Really opinionated – love it.  The speaker was extremely inspirational.” Chelsey Williams – 2nd Year Make-up and Hair Design for Music, Film and Photography, Southampton Solent

“It was pleasant to see action is finally being taken to address natural beauty in all shapes and sizes.  People need to be reminded of what is real and what is beautiful.” Amy Kirk – 2nd year Fashion Promotion, Southampton Solent University

University of the Creative Arts Epsom

“The world is a diverse place. The people in fashion are so diverse, the fashion schools are diverse. But why isn’t the product of fashion diverse, especially when it’s for the world. Fashion gets inspiration from African tribes, or Asian heritage, but there isn’t any evidence of representation on the catwalk.” Tracy Sada , Fashion Promotion Imagery – 1st Year at UCA Epsom

“As a curvy 20 year old, I feel that this directly affects me, especially as I embark onto a journey into the fashion industry – I feel as though I would need to lose weight to be taken seriously and successfully. Diversity is a topic I feel very strongly about and inspired about.” Sophie Ford , Fashion Journalism – 2nd Year at UCA Epsom

“I feel very strongly about this issue and often find myself asking questions that I’m glad All Walks is answering!” Nada Dahab , Fashion Promotion Imagery/Styling – 3rd Year at UCA Epsom

“It’s so refreshing to see an organization that cares, it’s just surprising that it’s taken until now to come around. So thank you for championing something that we all care about.” Colleen Ross , Fashion Journalism – 2nd Year at UCA Epsom

Edinburgh College of Art

“All Walks is a diverse selection – not just ‘thin’, not just ‘plus-size’ – a range between the two. All Walks is in it for the long run.” Melissa Thwaites , Fashion – 2nd Year at Edinburgh

“After listening to Caryn talk I feel inspired not only to improve my design but to make my customer feel more comfortable about themselves and feel more confident to wear high fashion.” Ainslie Hogg , Fashion – 3rd Year at Edinburgh

“All Walks is saying what I want to hear! I think this is what so many people want to hear and we’ve needed something like this organization to come along.” Bryony Grant , Fashion – 3rd Year at Edinburgh

“All Walks is an innovation that lies in addressing current issues/problems/things that need to be changed within the industry. We need to bring the fashion industry back in to the real world.” Katie Bremner , Fashion – 3rd Year At Edinburgh

“Through growing up, my figure has now become my own. It is important that we are individuals and All Walks is a starting point that could benefit and change so much for the better as I would love to celebrate my natural shape.” Barbra Kohasiwski , Fashion – 4th Year at Edinburgh

“All Walks embraces and celebrates not only body shapes but personality and culture in fashion. Health is the upmost important thing, and diversity of healthy body shapes need to be seen in the media to make a change.” Flora McFadden , Fashion – 2nd Year in Edinburgh

“All Walks is encouraging us not to feel afraid of breaking from the pack mentality in fashion.” Louis Alderson-Bythell , Fashion – 2nd Year in Edinburgh

The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“All Walks is important because no one is the same, and it’s important to appeal to everyone and make them feel happy and comfortable with who they are.” Zoe Purdom , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is hugely motivational. Clothes are there to be worn and enjoyed by everyone. Everyone is different and that should be celebrated.” Lottie Brooks , Fashion – 3rd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is brilliant because it is a positive message for younger fashion followers, to accept themselves, and not try and fit in to someone else’s view of perfect.” Sophie Pellatt , Fashion – 3rd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is helping get every body to be able to look into the mirror and be happy at what they see.” Shauni Paulley , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks has inspired me. My sister ad best friend were both anorexic so I feel strongly about the woman’s body image and how it is perceived. All Walks is saying things need to change – It’s dangerous and unfair.” Charlotte Holden , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is really inspiring and I will be researching it further to inspire and impact upon my work!” Ellis Currie , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

“All Walks is a brilliant campaign! I think more and more people would be involved in fashion if this kind of diversity was more evident.” Rachel Boxall , Fashion – 2nd Year in Bournemouth

“What All Walks is doing is exceptional and needs to be applauded.” Abbie Boorman– Level 5 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“All Walks is a brilliant way to get more people to think about diversity.  Thank you!! Brilliant.” Francesca Espinosa Baster– 1st Year BA Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“I feel All Walks is extremely relevant and exciting to Fashion currently.  I feel this debate is relevant because essentially fashion is about confidence and diversity and body shapes of all sizes should be celebrated!” Rachel Boxall – Level 6 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“Important and inspiring!” Joanna Dunne – 2nd Year Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“The All Walks presentation was fabulous and very informative.  I found it inspirational and a big eye-opener.” Neha Bhushan – Level 4 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“The presentation was extremely uplifting, reassuring that any size is beautiful.  This presentation is extremely inspiring and encouraging to make a change within the fashion industry.” Selina Platts – Level 5 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“It’s a huge relief to know about this work that is being done and that it’s so successful.  To see something powerful happening is fantastically relevant to a lot of people.” Jessica Bebb – 1st Year BA Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“All Walks is giving a voice to a mass audience that are faced with the on-going pressures and All Walks is exposing a real ideal.  It is something that needs to be recognised.” Sophie Wells – 2nd year BA Fashion, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“Fashion is about confidence and diversity – the body shapes of all should be celebrated.” Rachel Boxall – Level 6 Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“The All Walks presentation has made me think about my purpose within fashion and what my statement and ideal in fashion is.  Diversity is important for personality.  Without these we lose the meaning of fashion.” Oda Svendgard – Level 5 BA Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

“The lecture gave me a wonderful view into the inspiring works of All Walks Beyond The Catwalk.  I feel the campaign is representing the true female silhouette in a wonderful light and is uplifting for women to see a diverse range of women embracing and showing off their size, age & race.” Hollie Clark – 2nd year BA Fashion Studies, The Arts University College at Bournemouth

Grays School of Art. Aberdeen

The ‘All Walks’ campaign has given me hope that drastic changes could be taking place, with individuality being celebrated instead of discriminated against. The talk has inspired me to carry this open-minded attitude into my own career once I graduate. Alix Mcgillivray ,  age 19. 1st year BA  Fashion Management. Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

As a young designer the talk made me realize that we don’t have to make clothes to fit a 6ft, size 6 model for them to look beautiful. I don’t think it is healthy promoting highly photo shopped images presenting a false perception of beauty, this is something that I will now definitely change. Jamie Johnstone age 19. 2nd year BA  Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

What Caryn had to say was so refreshing to hear. Her talk had a very positive impact on me and she pointed out things I had not noticed, re: ethnicity on the catwalk. I was delighted to see the images of those beautiful women featured in All Walks Beyond the Catwalk. Vicki McLeod age  21.  2nd year BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

Caryn Franklin’s talk was extremely influential as it addressed issues that are extremely prominent and important. Her talk created exceedingly positive impact on my fashion studies opening my eyes and making me think. Suzanne Morrison age 18.1st year  BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I didn’t have much of an opinion on model sizing before Caryn brought it up. All Walks Beyond the Catwalk is a great project. Sian Parker age 20. 3rd  year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

The talk had a positive impact on my studies. It’s made me think about who will wear a garment before I design it and how the clothes look on all bodies not just a size 6-8, 6ft model on the catwalk. Clothes and fashion should be enjoyed by everyone, no matter what body shape and size they are. Laura Sheriffs age 18,1st  year  BA Art and Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I found Caryn so inspirational. The reason I wanted to get into fashion was to try promote the curvier model and even design for the curvier lady! I always thought it wasn’t encouraged in the industry so knowing that someone is actually doing something about it and making a difference and making a statement is so inspiring. We don’t all have to be caucasian blonde 6ft 2, Size 4 models. You don’t have to look like that to be beautiful! Respect what you’ve got and be proud of your body. Kristen McDermid age 21. 3rd year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

The work All Walks Beyond the Catwalk is doing to change people’s perceptions of fashion imagery is something that is quite simply inspirational! The lecture I attended has made me a lot more aware of this subject of diversity, Black, White, Asian, size 12, size 20……why not?? The celebration of diversity is something I am now acutely aware of. Kirsty Maclennan age 21. 1st year BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I thought the All Walks talk was an eye opener. I am really keen on watching the progress of this body diversity project, it is such a good idea. If this project can change something it would also make many women, including myself, more confident about my figure. Kelley Burness age 21. 2nd year BA Fashion  Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I found the talk inspiring I think that having only skinny fashion models is not a good thing to promote – as so many young girls today suffer from eating disorder and begin to think that their body’s are ugly. Kate Douglas age 20. 3rd  year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

The lecture was a real eye opener. The fashion industry in particular, has to start changing the way it promotes itself. The campaign has inspired me as it shows that some people within the industry are actually doing something. Julia Mcrae age 22. 1st  year  BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

Although I was aware that the fashion industry creates unachievable ‘ideals’ in the images it portrays, it had never struck me just how much influence it had over people, especially the young and impressionable girls. Hannah Fuller age  18,1st  year  BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

It gave me hope that maybe the end of the size 0 model is near. It is always nice to see how clothes look on a curvy girl instead of them just hanging on the thin models Eilidh Kerr age19. 1st  year  BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I agree that young girls today are being subjected to distorted images of the ‘ideal’ figure which leads them to an unreal evaluation of themselves.  Marketers of the fashion marketing adverts should be bearing this in mind when creating adverts such as Sisley’s ‘fashion junkie,’ concept which is ignorantly endorsing drug usage. I also felt empowered that the All Walks campaign was standing up for the right to be different and having an impact on the industry. Claire Milne age 20. 1st  year BA Fashion Management Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

I found the lecture very inspiring, the All Walks Beyond the Catwalk campaign is such an amazing idea, something which we definitely need. It was so refreshing to see positive body images that show just how beautiful every shape and size is. It made me think about my own final collection and how I want to create clothes for real sized women and not just follow the trend of the fashion industry and produce a collection to be shown on stick thin models. Amanda Montague age 20. 3rd year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

A few days before the talk, I had already decided to create a plus-size collection for my Final Project.  I work for Evans, and I am constantly surrounded by women who feel inadequate and too large for fashionable clothing. Not enough designers cater for real-life women and All Walks beyond the Catwalk has inspired me to follow through with my idea and create a wearable collection for the everyday lady. Christine Penman Age 21. 3rd  year BA Fashion Design Grays School of Art. Aberdeen.

London College of Fashion

‘Why do we photograph within a certain mould? It is damaging to people’s health. Why can’t a size 16 be beautiful? Or an 80 year old woman? Let’s make this change happen’. Danny Baldwin , age 23, 1st year photography student, LCF.

‘Change needs to happen, and through the commitment of the next generation, it can’. Melinda Barbi , age 19, 1st year photography student, LCF.

‘There is a HUGE gap between fashion communication and the real world. It is interesting to see that All Walks shows us that all diverses are welcomed’. Natasha Lechi , age 29, MA Strategic fashion marketing, LCF.

‘We have the power to promote and inspire change. We are all diverse and this needs to be reflected’. Chloe Macdonald , age 24, Journalism student, LCF.

‘I like how all bodies can be beautiful. This has made me feel a lot better about myself’. Sara Lofwander , age 22, Fashion Photography, LCF.

‘Most of us have been affected by such discrimination because we don’t fit into the ‘model’ norms’. The world is a big place. We need to cater for the entire population, not just a fraction of it’. Agnes , age 25, LCF student.

‘You don’t need to be a particular size or shape to look good in clothes. We should not ignore the sensitive issues but focus on them. We need to highlight that there is no such thing as perfect’. Helena Boyle , age 23, Journalism student, LCF.

‘Beauty comes in different sizes and forms and everyone has something to contribute to it. This talk has opened my eyes’.
Anup Pandey , age 22, Photography student, LCF.

‘In the fashion industry, we are in a position to decide what is communicated. After seeing this I will aim to promote a healthy self-image to women through the images I create’. Laura Bates , age 21, Fashion Styling student, LCF.

‘Thank you for inspiring me to stay on this path! Life is more rich when you open yourself to possibilities’. Meribeth Hasfurther , age 30, fashion styling student, LCF.

“Amazing!!  Positive energy as well as extremely stimulating.  I am a lot more conscious about having my own thoughts about diversity in fashion.” Kari Sundli– 2nd Year Fashion Journalism, London College of Fashion

“I am thoroughly  delighted to have been able to listen to Caryn Franklin today, I have followed All Walks for some time and to be able to hear and be exposed to more of the campaign was fantastic.” Monica Beatrice Welburn – 2nd Year Fashion Journalism & Broadcasting, London College of Fashion

“I think the ‘All Walks Beyond The Catwalk’ project is amazing.” Adeeba Faheem – 1st Year Fashion Illustration, London College of Fashion

“I absolutely loved the presentation, I found it very insightful and motivational.” Emily Ridler – 2nd Year Fashion Journalism & Broadcasting. London College of Fashion

“An inspiring and unique venture.  Caryn Franklin articulated this originality well with creative passion that’s equally inspiring.” Lucy Vincent – 2nd Year Fashion Journalism, London College of Fashion

“Empowering and uplifting; we don’t have to conform.” Asha Patel – 1st Year  Fashion Writing  and Culture, London College of Fashion

“Incredible.  Completely eye-opening.” Abigail Lewis – 1st Year Fashion Writing and Culture, London College of Fashion

“This presentation was excellent.  I feel so inspired and empowered to make change.  We don’t need to accept a rigid, one-dimensional point of view.  As journalists, we have the power to change the world and we will!  Fashion needs to help people to love themselves again.” Ellie Matthews – 2nd Year BA Fashion Journalism, London College of Fashion

Northumbria University

‘It would be great to see the fashion industry change one day. I cannot wait to take this concept with me into my career. There is no official ‘beauty’ and every aspect should be appreciated’. Samantha Upton , age 20, Northumbria.

‘I will go away from this lecture feeling proud to be different. I feel inspired and it makes me happy to know that something is being done to persuade people it is ok to be who they are’. Stephanie Harrod , age 19, Fashion Marketing, Northumbria.

‘Diversity is inspiring and so is fashion. The two fit hand in hand. Who wants to see a size 0 model, looking exactly the same as the one they saw yesterday? We are all different and it is something that should be showcased, not hidden’. Jenna Louise Sanderson , age 22, Northumbria.

‘I am not skinny myself and seeing somebody do something about the morphed body image we are used to has given me the confidence to stand up and do something about it myself’. Laura Mees Harris , age 22, Fashionwear Designer, Northumbria.

‘Why hasn’t this been covered sooner? This has encouraged me to stop following the norm and go with what I believe’. Rachel Robinson , age 19. Northumbria.

‘All walks makes me feel there is room for change. I’d like to think in four years from now when starting my own collection, it will be possible to use a diverse range of models for my designs in order to make people feel more accepted’. Rachael Henry , age 19, Fashion Marketing Student, Northumbria.

‘We need to embrace the fact we are all different, that’s the beauty of life. All walks makes me feel empowered. People are unique and we should not all be individuals. I feel empowered after listening to this talk’. Sophie Taylor , Fashion Marketing Student, Northumbria.

‘Diversity shows that everyone is different. We need to promote this in order to create a healthy lifestyle for the younger generation – both mentally and physically. We need to think outside the boundaries of what we see in magazines and go against the norm’. Rachael Burkey , age 20. Fashion Marketing Student, Northumbria.

‘On the catwalk, I want to notice the clothing, not the model. Shopping can be disappointing when you don’t look exactly the same, causing body hang ups’. Debz Harkins , age 22. Northumbria.

Ravensbourne

“An amazing presentation!” Yeekay Hau– Level 2 BA Fashion, Ravensbourne

“So interesting!  So relevant!  Something definitely to think about and act upon!  Brilliantlydelivered and thought out.  Very engaging!  The ideas are very refreshing!  Keep it up!” Pieioni – 2nd Year Fashion, Ravensbourne

“Very informative, truly thought-provoking and inspirational.” Luke Taylor – 2nd Year Fashion Promotion, Ravensbourne

“Fantastic!  Extremely relevant and very refreshing too.  Great to see someone so respected from the industry speaking out and making people think.  Thank you.” Nicolette Nadimi – 3rd Year Fashion & Textile Design, Ravensbourne

“I feel that what All Walks is doing is AMAZING.” Harriet Case – 3rd Year Fashion Promotion, Ravensbourne

“So very inspiring.  This talk has opened my eyes into just how serious this issue in the fashion world is and I wish this could be broadcasted all over the world so that hopefully it will change for the better.” Charlotte Sweet – 2nd Year FDA Fashion Product Innovation, Ravensbourne

“All Walks is amazing!  I really enjoyed the presentation – extremely interesting.” Yun-Yi Lin – 1st Year Fashion, Ravensbourne

“Loved the presentation – it was very interesting and inspiring.  Definitely makes you think!” Lauren Laurent – 1st Year Fashion Design, Ravensbourne

“The All Walks presentation gave a very refreshing take on a debate that has been running in the media for a long time now.  I feel it makes absolute sense to tap into the consciousness of the next generation of designers as we will be very influential when it comes to what is put out there.” Sarah Davies – 3rd year Fashion Promotion and Communication, Ravensbourne

“All Walks is a fantastic force in the positive promotion of diversity.” Madeleine Ayers – Level 2 Womenswear Design, Ravensbourne

University of Leeds

“I think All Walks is a very worthwhile initiative and has my full support.  I very much enjoyed Caryn’s discussion and hope ‘Every Body Counts’ continues it success!” Camilla Honey – 2nd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“Very insightful, poses many questions and opens your eyes to the new possibilities!  The presentation showed the great achievements of All Walks.” Paige Wilkins – 4th Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I think All Walks Beyond The Catwalk is a great campaign!” Josie Haslam – 4th Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“All Walks Beyond The Catwalk has restored my faith!” Hannah O’ Brien – 4th Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“Influential and very inspirational.” Emily Colley – Level 2 Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I’m really excited by the changes All Walks Beyond The Catwalk are making.  It’s great to see the progress being made!”
Scarlett Roland-Jones – 1st Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I found the All Walks presentation exciting because it is great to hear about action being taken, especially by women from within the industry.  I can recognize the effect that new media has had on my friends and I, and the pressure to conform to an ’ideal’.” Amy Gibson – 3rd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“Great to see so many big names are supporting the idea of individuality.” Rosemary Harrison – Fashion Design,University of Leeds

“It’s amazing to hear that there are people striving towards diversity within the industry.” Katherine Sherry – Level 4 Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“Very informative and exciting information about ‘real’ women – very inspiring!” Camilla Comben – 2nd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“All Walks portrays the power of individuality!” Chloe Snelling – 2nd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I really enjoyed this presentation – the confidence and passion really came across.” Tanya Wainwright – 1st Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“This debate was extremely relevant as body shapes are continually being debated in the media.  The ‘All Walks’ project celebrates individuality which should be embraced in all walks of life.” Sophie Mason – 2nd Year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I felt the All Walks presentation opened up issues I had not really considered before and instead of preaching, they were discussed and turned into opportunities for the future.  Caryn was a really passionate speaker with great knowledge of the industry.” Jennifer Llewellyn – 2nd year Fashion, University of Leeds

“The All Walks presentation was extremely informative and relevant.  You made me really think about the industry in different ways.  I feel like I have learnt so much in just one hour and it has left me with exciting thoughts and ideas.  I think this is due to Caryn Franklin’s enthusiasm on the subject.  It informs us as the students, especially on how much impact the Fashion industry has on society and how we can help change the industry from where it is today. Chia Nieto – 1st year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“It’s amazing to hear that there are people striving towards diversity within theindustry.  When I see people younger than myself growing up and really struggling with body image I think it’s the duty of the industry to help not to hinder.   As a designer, I can’t imagine finding out that young girls are struggling with their image because of the models they have seen in my campaigns.” Katherine Sherry – Level 4 Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“I feel the All Walks presentation was so refreshing.  I feel very strongly about the campaign and have been driven to keep the ideas of diversity in fashion in mind. I’m really glad we’ve had the opportunity to take a step back and think about diversity in fashion now, rather than later.  Thank you!” Emily Foan – 2nd year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

“Interesting and highly inspirational.  In a world so diverse in size and ethnicity, why shouldn’t the fashion industry reflect this?  It is exciting to see people striving to achieve this.  I would love to see this principle taken further, especially in education.” Bryony Unwin – 1st year Fashion Design, University of Leeds

Plymouth College of Art

“Inspired!  I like the idea of including everyone!  I feel this debate is entirely relevant because everybody has insecurities and anythingthat makes people happier in their own skin is a positive.” Rosemary Guppy – 2nd Year Fashion Foundation Degree, Plymouth College of Art

“I think All Walks is a fantastic idea!  I’m glad that you are proving that it doesn’t matter what size or race you are, individuality is beautiful.  We should be creating young women with confidence rather than insecurities!” Victoria Parnell – 1st Year Fashion BA (Hons), Plymouth College of Art

“I think that what All Walks is doing is amazing!  I really agree with the presentation and it has given me the confidence to go ahead with my plans of launching my brandthat will be aimed a curvy women, who still want high end fashion!  Keep it up!” Laura Raymond – 3rd Year Fashion BA (Hons), Plymouth College of Art

“The All Walks presentation was great!  And this was without trying to force any opinions on me.  It made me aware that I will have a responsibility to be conscious through my design work.” Stefani Nurding – 1st Year Fashion BA (Hons), Plymouth College of Art

“The All Walks presentation was great! Raised plenty of debates and got me thinking about positive changes I could make as a designer.  As we are currently at the stage of pinpointing our customer, it is important to know who we are making for and the impact it might have on them or the industry.” April Finney – 3rd Year BA Top Up, Plymouth College of Art

Central Saint Martins

“Very inspiring. It makes me think of my future projects and think outside the box with the model-choice. As a man though, it would be interesting to see if All Walks will push this campaign towards the mail body…I think this debate is relevant. We are the future of this industry and it makes me think of how we can change this.” Leonard Arced, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Central Saint Martins

“It’s something local to me. It’s good to hear what I think being voiced by somebody (All Walks) very passionately in the industry…This debate is definitely relevant, but things are also definitely changing, we’re not on the early stitches of a change. Louis Backhouse,  1st Year Fashion Communication, Central Saint Martins

“Your campaign is what everybody knows, but also what everybody avoids to talk about…This debate is a crucial point, and I’ve just realised, I’ve been perceiving fashion imagery without any consciousness. I just thought it was because it had to be. However, now is a time for finding and changing the way to show fashion messages.” Shinhye Kim, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“As a Japanese studying fashion in the UK, I’ve been thinking about diversity in the fashion industry for a while now. Sometimes I’m so tired of “the idea of European beauty,” as a lot of people expect all women to look like Western girls. Diversity in fashion is definitely something I want to explore.” Eri Yoshikawa, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“Fantastic, incredibly inspirational to watch the video and see how alive the models were – movement, emotion…Over the past 10 years, it has become “accepted” that you can never look like a model, fashion imagery is generally unattainable and it must STOP being accepted.” Camilla Harrison, 2nd Year Fashion History & Theory, Central Saint Martins

“ A good and somewhat new approach to the problem that the fashion industry has been having for a while. Made me think…whether the fashion editorial nowadays is effective or not…Perhaps society is going for an “idea of beauty” rather than what real beauty is.” Sue Kim, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion  Central Saint Martins

“We are all very close to this subject. It’s even weird I haven’t thought about this before.” Hanna Moon,  2nd Year Fashion Communication, Central Saint Martins

“I admire All Walks’ change and motivation. Fashion has been representing fashion in the same way. But fashion is really related to art and different views…This debate will change the way fashion direction leads us and the future of design. Fashion designers must be challenged to create garments for a diverse range of sizes.” Clorinda Siag,  1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“Wish you could promote the campaign in Asia…the fashion industry really needs this voice.”Coco Yu,  1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“It is interesting seeing that people in the industry are staring to acknowledge the issue…This debate is relevant…we will be the future image makers.” Janice Lee,  1st year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“ Very inspirational, highlighting an issue that does still need to be addressed…I still don’t think this debate is being pushed enough to the extreme though! More people need to get on board eg. photographers. Images still too glossy.
”2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

“The debate is very relevant as it is an ongoing topic which holds importance in our culture.” Toni-Blaze Ibekue, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Central Saint Martins

Nottingham Trent University

“Fantastic! Completely agree with the whole message – a big issue that people are obsessed with this ‘ideal’ body/woman. This debate is 100% relevant in society everyone wants to improve what they have instead of being happy with what they have. Also with the new campaigns for different races, sizes, and age—it shows that people want to improve society.”
Sophie Lawron,  1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“I thought the presentation was very inspirational. Individuality has been lost within the fashion industry and it can be very degrading to see versions of the same model/ideal everywhere…This debate is especially relevant now with the many causes of depression/eating disorders/low self-esteem.” Emily Sanders,  1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“This debate is incredibly relevant. We are in a day and age where we are used to seeing size 0 models, an “unachievable ideal.” We need to be inspired by diversity and start to question why we have to look a certain way.” Harley Chapman,  2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“This debate was extremely relevant—majority of the population are not model size! Why advertise the clothes not the way they will look on MOST people?! Inspired me to raise this issue with some high school students I’m working with who struggle with confidence on the catwalk.” Hallie Nesinger, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“I feel inspired and motivated on helping the movement from the typical images showing and portraying fashion on these disturbing images (thin/frail models) to using more inspirational and realistic models. I will now analyse fashion imagery differently (use of story/body) more critically.” Kate Brown,  2nd Year Fashion Marketing and Branding, Nottingham Trent University

“Really inspiring. I think this is definitely an area to push. Women need to feel more confident with themselves. I don’t feel like I have the body I want, and its is definitely due to all the images I have been exposed to even though I am a healthy weight…Models and attitude need to change especially for the future of NHS, which will have to cope with depression and mental health. People should enjoy their lives and make the most of them. No one deserves to feel down about themselves unnecessarily.” Sarah Baker, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“Really Inspirational! I’m currently writing a piece about the idea of the “ordinary” model—the fashion industry’s interpretation—so gave me a lot of interesting ideas to explore…The debate is extremely relevant and needs to be dealt with now so that the future generations can have a healthier view of women.” Libby Kates, 3rd Year Textiles Designs, Nottingham Trent University

“This debate is incredibly relevant. I’ve seen my best friends be so unbelievably distraught about what their bodies look like and I blame the fashion industry hugely. Men and women have internalized these ideas of beauty and the effects are so detrimental to society.” Roxana Jebreel, 3rd Year Textiles Designs, Nottingham Trent University

“Fashion would not exist without the body, so how we as creatives promote the body and the clothes they wear is very important. It makes me, as a women, feel let down by the industry I aspire to.” Hollie Funess,  2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“Really interesting and inspirational. Often hear about new plus size ranges but only with brands like Dove and Isme. It’s not mainstream enough.” Olivia Thomas,  2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“As a larger girl in a fashion course it’s good to see that people from the industry are taking us into consideration. It was an eye opener.” Nicole Warr,  1st year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“I believe we’ve grown up in an industry where small models are the norm, and it would be a shock for that to suddenly change; however, I think it’s important to be educated and surrounded by acceptable media from day one…I feel more confident about having a different opinion and less scared to take a different direction.” Ellen Clarke, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“Very relevant…I just don’t know if it will ever be overcome. What All Walks has done so far though is amazing and a great start.” Jade Barltrop, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

I really enjoyed the presentation. I think it’s interesting an good to know that there is a group of people actually changing this problem, and doing it successfully.” Sophie Boyd, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“This debate is always present in today’s media, so it will always be relevant in today’s society.” Vicky Wilson, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“Inspiring! Want to help and promote this message more.” Charolette Exiey, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion , Nottingham Trent University

“Very relevant. As a fashion student, I am constantly evaluating images and forming an opinion about them. It is nice to be reminded that beauty is not “one size fits all,” it is okay to find beauty in all forms.” Laura Wensley,  Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University on exchange from Ryerson University in Toronto

“All Walks highlights many campaigns promoting different sizes, shapes, skin tones, that I wasn’t aware of. It is extremely encouraging that the future of fashion may become more diverse and fair…I think this will be an ongoing debate within the fashion industry as designers/creative directors/photographers/sponsors are still split between approaches towards size zero…I’m grateful this presentation was available to me!” Ellie Ward, 1st Year  Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“This presentation has given a voice to real women—with real figures. The industry dictates a rigid size—which is both unachievable and unrealistic! The debate is hugely relevant. It is so relieving that slowly by slowly certain designers are taking a stand and incorporating curvy models.” Lucynda Jackson, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“All Walks’ presentation was highly aspirational and interesting. The idea of using models of all types is an exciting and intriguing concept that I feel would be highly beneficial for generations to come—specifically on their opinion of body image.” Kristina Semonella, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“Caryn talks with enthusiasm and intellect. I thoroughly enjoyed the presentation…Fashion is an extremely powerful vehicle for communication. It has as a responsibility to send out more positive messages.” Alice Hammerton, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“Really interesting initiative and thoughts behind “what is aspirational?” – why is the 4/6 6 foot model seen as aspirational, rather than Laura (the Special K model) who is seen as aspirational to the everyday consumer but not when she’s on the catwalk? Very thought provoking.” Lotty Barahona, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“All Walks brought forward ideas we were aware of but didn’t think it was realist to try and change. It shows that small steps really can make a difference. When I enter the industry I will remember what aspirations fashion images can show and the importance of diversity.” Katie Ottewell, 1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“I am of Indian origin and have always been conscious of the lack of models ‘with color.’ I don’t see why it is such a big deal when there is somebody who looks slightly different on the cover of a magazine. It should be normal. So yes, definitely relevant. I really like seeing older women modeling as I like it when woman embrace aging rather than trying to change, so this small change in itself is inspiring.” Gina Solanki, 2nd Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“Inspirational, an empowerment of real women.” Lauren Annie Wilson  1st Year Fashion Communication and Promotion, Nottingham Trent University

“I thought the presentation was very informative, inspirational and motivational. I truly hope this is indicative of where the future of the fashion industry is heading. Change begins with one simple idea, All Walks is an amazing initiative.”
Kaya Areneau,  Final Year International Fashion Business, Nottingham Trent University

Plymouth College of Art

“Loved it, loved it, loved it!!!!  The All Walks presentation was really required at Plymouth. Thank you for this!” Romaine White – 2nd Year Fashion Foundation Degree, Plymouth College of Art

“You rarely find a woman that is happy in her own skin these days—no matter how beautiful you believe she is. The world needs to see that we are all beautiful in our own individual ways. I really appreciate what All Walks is doing.” Sarah Butterfield, 2nd Year Fashion and Textiles, Plymouth College of Art

“I completely think this debate is relevant. What is the point of alienating the majority of your consumers before they even consider design?” Sherry Pritchet,  3rd Year BA (honors) top-up, Plymouth College of Art

“The presentation has made me see how fashion works in a different light and has made be feel better about myself and how I look.” Amiee Deubert, 2nd Year Fashion, Plymouth College of Art

“As designers of the future we have the opportunity to make a difference by changing people’s perceptions about beauty.”
Helen Cobbold, Masters Degree Creative Entrepreneur, Plymouth College of Art

“I think this is a highly relevant topic. Within these past couple of years, I’ve become more aware of how fashion imagery affects real people. I we are to make woman and men of any age feel beautiful then I think we need to show a greater diversity within the fashion industry in terms of catwalk and digital media.” Sara Mills, 3rd Year BA Fashion, Plymouth College of Art

Camarthanshire College

The talk was very insprational. It’s good to know there have been some positive steps of awareness towards age, size and race in fashion. It seems like high profile designers are now taking notice which is a step in the right direction. The perceptions of ideology are changing because of the great work of All walks Beyond the Catwalk. This can only impact a great change in society. Julia Maddocks-Thomas, BA Fashion 3rd Year Camarthanshire College

It was great, far far better than I expected. She spoke with such passion and understanding on the subject it really inspired me! I now look at the fashion industry with new eyes and an open mind. Since the talk I see beyond the glamorous, beautiful editorials we see in the magazines. Thanks Caryn, your passion for the subject was incredible! Carys Hughs 2nd year BA (Hons) fashion design Camarthanshire College

That lecture made me feel like it’s the beginning of a new era. More and more people are finally catching on to the psychological damage that this obsession with ‘skinny’ is causing. Great stuff! Beverley Gill. BA2 Fashion Camarthanshire College

South Essex College

“Such an eye-opener! This is one of the most important issues in fashion at the moment, especially for young girls.”
Jennifer Routledge-2nd Year, Fashion Promotion, South Essex College.

“The presentation has made me feel very differently about the media. I’ve realised that I do have an opinion and that my opinion really does count.” Jannaire Faulkner-2nd Year, Fashion, Communication and Marketing, South Essex College.

“As a size 16/18, I think All Walks is important because it makes me feel like I can be in the industry despite my size and that I shouldn’t be discriminated against!” Rosie Macquire-1st Year, Fashion, Communication and Marketing, South Essex College.

“I feel very uplifted and confident in embracing myself after hearing the All Walks presentation! It was really refreshing to hear someone in the fashion industry speak so openly and broad-mindedly.” Imogen Culliford-1st Year, Fashion Design, South Essex College.

“Really eye-opening! The media talks about the body sizes of models but you don’t hear much about using a range of races and ages too.” Amy Whalley-2nd Year, BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Fashion Design, South Essex College.

“I feel very inspired and more knowledgeable about the industry. Race and equality comes up a lot in modern day culture so why shouldn’t it in fashion? I feel more confident now and want to share this information with my friends-it will benefit them too!” Emily Laing-BTEC Level 3 Art and Design, South Essex College.

“This presentation was very inspiring and I agree that, by designing for and showing only on skinny models, design is limited.” Holly Anderson-2nd Year, BTEC National Extended Diploma, South Essex College.

“I am very pleased that I was lucky enough to be part of this lecture! As the next generation we should be considering all these unspoken issues within the fashion industry and working towards something better.” Meghan Booysen-2nd Year, Fashion Design, South Essex College.

“This is so relevant in a society where we are being told to be who we are and to be confident in our bodies yet fashion campaigns are still promoting size 0 models!” Amy Dorking-2nd Year, BTEC Level 3 Diploma Fashion Design, South Essex College.

Liverpool John Moores University

“So inspiring! I’ve realised that I do things just so they are accepted and relevant rather than to change people’s perceptions. It has made me think more about how I portray body image in my own work!” Amy Hunt-3rd Year, Fashion Communication, Liverpool John Moores University.

“This issue needs to be addressed more within the fashion industry. It’s important that students like myself are not brainwashed into one way of thinking at an early age!” Sophie Harry-1st Year, Fashion Design, Liverpool John Moores University.

“Very empowering! I am still surprised by the sizes that the fashion world caters for when the UK average is a 16!” Charly Calvey-1st Year, Fashion Communication, Liverpool John Moores University.

“I really enjoyed the presentation and feel so much better knowing something is being done about the issue. I will seriously consider working with ‘non-stereotypical’ body types in the future.” Lois Ventre-3rd Year, Fashion Design, Liverpool John Moores University.

“It was lovely and very inspirational to see people actively campaigning for healthy body image through the media when we have become so desensitised to unhealthy images and their effects.” Katie Davidson-3rd Year, Fashion Design, Liverpool John Moores University.

University of Central Lancashire.

“100% agree, this presentation will have opened the eyes of so many girls in this room. It has certainly opened mine!” Hannah Grace-3rd Year Fashion Promotion with Styling, University of Central Lancashire.

“Brilliant! All Walks has really made me see how society has become desensitised to real beauty and can only see one form now.” Emily Ryan-2nd Year, Fashion Entrepreneurship, University of Central Lancashire.

“All Walks empowers individuality and creativity! It’s about time the fashion industry acknowledged that there isn’t just one beauty ideal and people don’t want to feel pressurised to fit a certain mold.”Claire Boyle-2nd Year, Fashion Entrepreneurship, University of Central Lancashire.

Really got the creative juices flowing with loads of campaign ideas! Jade Skye Patersoln-2nd Year, Fashion Entrepreneurship, University of Central Lancashire.

“I love the All Walks approach to body diversity! It’s so important to express that there is no normal and all women are beautiful.” Kimberley Ward-1st Year, Fashion and Brand Promotion, University of Central Lancashire.

“Fantastic! This is a real industry issue and it is amazing that high profile industry members are taking part.” Clare Verwoerd-2nd Year, Fashion Entrepreneurship, University of Central Lancashire.

ASOS

Yes we also give presentations on Corporate Social Responsibility days.

“Thanks Caryn-really inspiring! As an organisation with such a social media presence, ASOS has the power to ensure its customers join the debate.” Claire Hamer-Sustainable Fashion Manager and ASOS Africa Buyer, ASOS.

“Thank-you for encouraging me to embrace me, my flaws and I! Individuality is the way forward!” Debbie Shasanya-Production Assistant for ASOS Magazine, ASOS.

“This debate is really relevant to ASOS, especially as we are selling to an increasingly younger and fashion-conscious market. We often have discussions over retouching in terms of what needs doing and how far we should go.” Chris Williams-Art Editor of ASOS Magazine, ASOS.

“The talk was great, so practical and inspiring! My department looks at what is featured on the homepage, Facebook, email, campaigns etc. and I’d love for us to represent a wider range of customers in this. ASOS should be a fashion democracy, a way for everyone to discover fashion!” Helen Lawrence-Marketing Manager for New Platforms, ASOS.

“Really interesting and exciting! We are currently researching better ways to write copy for our specialist areas including ASOS Curve and researching how others in the industry do this.” Hayley Leaver-Copywriter, ASOS.

“The way All Walks is heading should and hopefully be the future. ASOS should definitely be on board!” Adam Slawson-Senior Global Content Manager, Menswear, ASOS.

“It’s hugely positive to have been made aware of the work that All Walks are doing. Influencing the models used for our website shoots and personalising the site based on body size/ shape are steps we can take immediately.” Debra Clarke-Project Manager, ASOS.

“We are all really focused on being customer centric but developing our ASOS Curve and Petite ranges would cement customer loyalty further.” Charlotte White-CRM Marketing Assistant, ASOS.